Meet Rebecca Gould

WordMothers

Interview by Nicole Melanson ~

Interview with writer and translator Rebecca Gould by Nicole Melanson - photo by Georgios Tzamalis

Rebecca Gould is a translator, writer, and scholar of Persian, Russian, and Georgian literature. Her books include Writers and Rebels: The Literatures of Insurgency in the Caucasus (Yale University Press, 2016) and the translations After Tomorrow the Days Disappear: Ghazals and Other Poems of Hasan Sijzi of Delhi (Northwestern University Press, 2016), and The Prose of the Mountains: Tales of the Caucasus (Central European University Press, 2015). Her work has also appeared in The Hudson Review, The Gettysburg Review, KenyonReview Online, Guernica, TheGlobe & Mail, and Nimrod, and many other venues.

Rebecca has lived on both the west and east coasts of the United States, as well as in Berlin, Singapore, Bethlehem, Palestine, Singapore, and Budapest. She currently teaches Translation Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Bristol in the UK.

Rebecca’s website

Twitter: @rrgould

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Introducing Rebecca Gould

IntLawGrrls

rebeccagouldIt’s our great pleasure today to introduce Rebecca Gould as an IntLawGrrls contributor. Rebecca is Reader in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies at the University of Bristol in the UK. She holds a PhD in Middle Eastern and Comparative Literatures from Columbia University, and has taught at New York University, Columbia University, and Yale-NUS College in Singapore.

Her work deals with Muslim migration and forced displacement, law and culture in the Caucasus, political theory, postcoloniality, and transnational feminism. She is the author of Writers and Rebels: The Literatures of Insurgency in the Caucasus (Yale University Press, 2016), and the translator of After Tomorrow the Days Disappear: Ghazals and Other Poems of Hasan Sijzi of Delhi (Northwestern University Press, 2016), and The Prose of the Mountains: Tales of the Caucasus (Central European University Press, 2015). She writes on politics and culture in the Islamic world for Project Syndicate, Transitions Online

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A Double Standard for White Terrorists

IntLawGrrls

Almost immediately after it emerged that a white supremacist had stabbed three men who were trying to prevent him from attacking Muslim women in a Portland train, killing two of them, efforts at mitigation began.

“We don’t know if he’s got mental health issues,” Sgt. Pete Simpson said in the first public statement about the May 26 incident. Added the perpetrator’s childhood friend, “All I have to say is I hope this brings attention to the need for mental health facilities and more outreach.” His mother struck a similarly apologetic note: “He’s always been spouting anti-establishment stuff but he’s a nice person.”

Inevitably, those close to the perpetrator tried to explain away the hate that drove this crime. Yet what this individual did was fundamentally a political act, and in a country where politicians are increasingly wary of condemning racially motivated violence. In his trial for the Charleston shooting, another…

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